Spotkanie I D z Silvią z Włoch

Wstęp: 

Last week, our class had a visitor from Italy, Silvia. She was born and raised in Italy but her mother is Polish. She is a volunteer under the European Voluntary Service (now called Erasmus+) and has been living in Poland for almost 12 months.

Last week, our class had a visitor from Italy, Silvia. She was born and raised in Italy but her mother is Polish. She is a volunteer under the European Voluntary Service (now called Erasmus+) and has been living in Poland for almost 12 months.
She told us a little bit about her country. Italy is divided into regionswith their own traditions, languages and food specialties. For example, “spaghetti alla bolognese”comes from a different region from pizza or some regions prefer to add pecorino to their pasta rather than parmesan.
Before television, standard Italian was the language of intellectuals, while common people used to speak their own regional languages, known as “dialetti”. These languages however are not varieties of the Italian language but proper languages on their own, which date back before the birth of Italian. These languages are still spoken but it is becoming more and more difficult to pass them down from generation to generation.
The Italian education system is slightlydifferent from the Polishone.When they reach the age of six, children start attending elementary school (they are allowed to start one year earlier). Elementary school lasts 5 years, which is followed by 3 years of middle school. Then it is time for the students to choose between high school, which lasts 5 years, and technical school, which can last from 3 to 5 years.
In conclusion,she showed us that Italy consists of different regional traditions and not just pizza and pasta.
Katarzyna Kostrzyńska, kl.1d

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